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An Overview of the Different Types of Cancer

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Adrenal Cancer:

Adrenal Cancer is cancer that begins in the small glands that sit above each of the kidneys, which are located inside the upper part of the abdomen.

These glands are important to the body’s endocrine, or hormonal, system. Each adrenal gland has two main parts that function separately:

Adrenal cortex: The cortex is the outer part of the adrenal gland, and is where most tumors develop.The function of the cortex is to make hormones. The adrenal cortex makes three main hormones: cortisol, which helps the body handle stress, aldosterone, which helps regulate the level of salt in the blood, and precursors for adrenal androgens like dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). These hormones are essential for healthy metabolism and body characteristics, such as hair growth and body shape.

Adrenal medulla: The medulla is the inner part of the adrenal gland. The adrenal medulla makes three hormones called catecholamines: epinephrine, also called adrenaline, norepinephrine, and dopamine. The hormones made in the medulla control the body’s responses to stress.

Adrenal cortical cancer

  • Adrenocortical carcinoma: adrenocortical carcinoma is the most common type of cancerous adrenal gland tumor. It is also known as adrenal cortical carcinoma. Adrenocortical cancer is rare, approximately four to 12 out of one million people develop this type of tumor. These tumors often spread to lymph nodes and other organs or tissues. The tumors from the adrenal cortex produce excess secretion of steroid hormones and aldosterone.

Adrenal medulla tumors and cancers

  • Pheochromocytoma: These tumors, that are rare and usually benign, begin in the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla. Tumors from the adrenal medulla produce excessive amounts of catecholamines.

Bladder cancer

Bladder cancer is a type of abnormal cell malignancy that begins in the cells of the bladder, the balloon-shaped organ which functions as a waste storage system for urine.

Transitional cell (urothelial) carcinoma: is cancer that begins in the urinary tract transitional epithelium cells lining the inside of the bladder. Transitional cell carcinoma is the most common kind of bladder cancer, occurring in about 95% of cases.

Squamous cell carcinoma: is cancer that begins when epithelial cells change to squamous cells (thin, flat cells) as a result of chronic irritation and inflammation. About 1% to 2% of bladder cancers are squamous cell carcinomas.

Adenocarcinoma: is cancer that begins in the cells of glandular structures lining the inner lining of the bladder. Adenocarcinomas account for only about 1% of bladder cancers.

The brain cancer overview

The brain and spinal column make up the central nervous system where vital functions such as thought, speech and bodily movement are controlled. A brain tumor begins when normal cells in the brain mutate and grow uncontrollably, forming a tumor. Brain tumors can be low grade (slow growing) or high grade (fast growing).

A brain tumor is an abnormal growth of tissue in the brain or central spine that can disrupt proper brain function. Doctors refer to a tumor based on where the tumor cells originated, and whether they are cancerous (malignant) or not (benign).

Benign: Benign tumors are the least aggressive type of brain tumor. They originate from cells within or surrounding the brain, do not contain cancer cells, grow slowly, and typically have clear borders that do not spread to other tissue.

Malignant: Malignant brain tumors contain cancer cells and often do not have clear borders. They are considered to be life threatening because they grow rapidly and invade surrounding brain tissue.

Primary: Primary brain tumors start in cells of the brain and are called primary brain tumors. Primary brain tumors may spread to other parts of the brain or to the spine, but rarely to other organs.

Metastatic: Metastatic brain tumors begin in another part of the body and then spread to the brain. These tumors are more common than primary brain tumors and are named by the location in which they begin.

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Breast cancer overview

Breast cancers are malignancies that develop in the tissues of one or both breasts. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the United States, other than Skin Cancer.

There are two main types of breast cancer:

  • Ductal carcinoma is the most common breast cancer and starts in the tubes, or ducts, that move milk from the breast to the nipple.
  • Lobular carcinoma originates from the lobules which produce milk.

Breast cancer can be invasive or noninvasive:

Invasive breast cancers includes cancers which have spread from the milk duct or lobule to other tissues in the breast.

  • Representing 10-15% of invasive breast cancers, invasive ductal carcinoma occurs when cancer cells spread beyond the basement membrane, which covers the underlying connective tissue in the breast.
  • Invasive lobular carcinoma describes 70-80% of breast cancers which spread through the wall of the milk producing lobule, and are characterized by branch-like growing patterns.

Noninvasive refers to breast cancer that has not invaded other breast tissue.

  • Noninvasive breast cancers include Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) and Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).

Some breast cancers are sensitive to the hormone estrogen, which causes breast cancer to grow. These cancers have estrogen receptors and are called ER-positive cancer.

Some breast cancers are HER2-positive, which refers to a gene that helps cells to grow, divide and repair themselves faster than normal.

Cervical cancer overview.

Cervical cancer is cancer that starts in the cervix, the narrow opening into the uterus from the vagina. Most cervical cancers (80-90%) are squamous cell cancers. Adenocarcinoma is the second most common type of cervical cancer (10-20%). Adenocarcinoma develops from the glands that produce mucus in the endocervix.

Cervical cancer usually develops slowly. It starts as a precancerous condition called dysplasia. This condition can be detected by a Pap smear and is treatable. The sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in about 99% of cervical cancers.

There are over 100 different types of HPV, most of which are considered low-risk and typically resolve on their own. High-risk HPV types may cause cervical cell abnormalities or cancer. More than 70% of cervical cancer cases can be attributed to two high- risk types of the virus, HPV-16 and HPV-18.

Cancer of the cervix tends to occur during midlife. Half of the women diagnosed with the disease are between 35 and 55 years of age. It rarely affects women under age 20, and approximately 20 percent of diagnoses are made in women older than 65.

Colorectal cancer

Colorectal Cancer is the combined term for two types of cancer, colon cancer and rectal cancer (the last several inches of the colon), and is often referred to as colon cancer. Colon cancer develops in the tissues of the large intestine, the lower part of your digestive system. Most cases of colon cancer originate as small clusters of cells called polyps which become malignant over time. In later stages of the disease, cancerous cells may penetrate the colon wall and spread (metastasize) to nearby lymph nodes or surrounding organs.

Polyps may be small and produce few, if any, symptoms. For this reason, doctors recommend regular screening tests to help prevent colon cancer by identifying polyps before they become colon cancer.

Esophageal cancer

Esophageal cancer is cancer that forms in tissues lining the esophagus (the hollow, muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach which lies behind the trachea and in front of the spine.

Cancer of the esophagus usually begins in the inner layer of the esophageal wall (the mucosa) and grows outward (through the submucosa and the muscle layer). If it spreads through the esophageal wall, it can travel to lymph nodes, blood vessels in the chest, and other nearby organs. Esophageal cancer can also spread to the lungs, liver, stomach, and other parts of the body.

The two major types of esophageal cancer are squamous cell carcinoma (cancer that begins in flat cells lining the esophagus) and adenocarcinoma (cancer that begins in cells that make and release mucus and other fluids).

Squamous cellcarcinoma

Cancer begins in the squamous cells which line the esophagus and is usually detected in the upper and middle part of the esophagus.

Adenocarcinoma

Cancer start in glandular cells of the esophagus. Most adenocarcinomas begin in the lower esophagus where the esophagus joins the stomach.

Very rarely, in less than 1% of tumors of the esophagus, cancers include small cell neuroendocrine cancers, lymphomas, and sarcomas.

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Head and neck cancer

Head and neck cancer is the term given to cancers which develop above the collarbone. The most common sites for head and neck cancers are the oral cavity, throat, larynx, salivary glands, nose, and sinuses.

Oral Cavity: cancer of the oral cavity (the mouth and tongue) is the most common type of head and neck cancer. Most oral cancers arise in the tongue, the lip, the floor of the mouth, and the minor salivary glands.

Throat: nasopharyngeal cancer originates in the air pathway at the upper part of the throat behind the nose. Laryngeal cancer: laryngeal cancer arises in the larynx, located at the top of the trachea and responsible for speech (commonly called the voice box), is the second most common type of head and neck cancer.

Salivary Gland: salivary cancer originates in the salivary glands which produce saliva containing enzymes to begin food breakdown and digestion.

Nose: nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer originates in the space just behind the nose where air passes on the way to the throat and the air-filled areas that surround the nasal cavity.

The most common type (about 90%) of malignant tumor of the head and neck area is squamous cell cancer. Squamous cells are flat cells typically found in the lining of the mouth, nose and throat. Melanomas on the inside of the nose and lymphomas in the neck region are also classified as head and neck cancers.

The kidney cancer:

The kidneys are a pair of 4 or 5 inch long bean-shaped organs located in the back of the abdomen, on either side of the spine. The function of the kidneys is to filter the blood, remove wastes, control fluid balance, regulate electrolytes and make urine.

Kidney Cancer, also called Renal Cancer, is a disease where kidney cells become malignant, grow uncontrollably and form a tumor. Most kidney cancers start in the lining of very small tubules in the kidney. These renal cell carcinomas account for 90% of kidney cancer. Kidney cancer occurs most often in people age 55 or older, and is slightly more common in men.

Renal cell carcinoma usually grows as a single mass within a kidney. In rare cases, there are two or more tumors in one kidney, or tumors in both kidneys. Renal cell carcinomas are usually fast growing and can spread to the lungs and surrounding organs.

Leukemia

Leukemia is cancer of the body’s blood-forming tissues, including the bone marrow and lymphatic system. Leukemia begins in a cell in the bone marrow, the spongy center inside of the bones where cells develop from stem cells into red cells, white cells or platelets. In leukemias, the cell mutates and becomes a type of leukemia cell classified by type of cell and by pattern of growth.

Lymphoid cells and Myeloid cells: the marrow forms myeloid cells which normally go on to form red cells. Myeloid leukemia can begin in these cells. The marrow also forms lymphocytes, the infection-fighting cells of the immune system. Lymphocytic leukemia can arise in these cells.

Acute and Chronic Leukemias: leukemias are also classified by how quickly they progress, in acute leukemia, immature white blood cells multiply rapidly in the bone marrow and are called blasts. Instead of functioning properly as the body’s infection fighters, these abnormal cells fill the blood, leaving little space for healthy cells. Acute leukemias progress rapidly without treatment. In chronic leukemia, the cancer develops more slowly, and is often diagnosed due to enlargement of the spleen.

The four main types of leukemias include:

  • Acute myeloid leukemia (AML)
  • Acute lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)
  • Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)

Acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia-in these diseases, the acute leukemia cell multiplies to form a trillion more leukemia cells. Unlike healthy cells, these cells are called ‘nonfunctional’ because they do not function as normal and crowd out the normal cells in the marrow. With the resulting decrease in healthy red cell production, patients often experience anemia and increased bleeding and infection risks.

Chronic myeloid leukemia-the cell that begins this disease makes mature blood cells that function similar to normal cells. The number of red blood cells produced is usually less than normal, while the white blood cell count increases, which can result in severe anemia.

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia-the cell that begins this disease makes too many non- functioning lymphocytes. These cells interfere with the normal lymphocytes, causing a decrease in healthy red and white cell counts, and a weakened immune system. CLL is characterized by slow disease progression, often not requiring treatment for long periods of time.

Liver Cancer Overview

The liver is the organ in the body that is essential for the digestion of food. It filters blood from the intestines, processes nutrients and removes toxins. It also helps maintain the proper blood sugar levels in the body and produces some of the body’s blood clotting factors.

Liver cancer is the growth and spread of unhealthy cells in the liver. The most common form (80%) of liver cancer is called Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC). It begins in the hepatocytes, the main type of liver cell. HCC can have different growth patterns. The most common pattern in the United States is a tentacle-like growth through the liver, although some start as a single tumor that spreads to other parts of the liver.

Other subtypes of primary liver cancer:

Bile duct cancer (cholangiocarcinoma), which accounts for 10-20% of liver cancer cases, starts in the small tubes that carry the bile made in the liver to the gallbladder, and in the bile ducts that carry bile from the gallbladder to the intestines.

Angiosarcoma and Hemangiosarcomas, which account for 1% of liver cancer patients, are fast growing cancers that originate in the blood vessels of the liver.

It is common for other types of cancers such as colon, stomach, pancreatic, breast or lung cancer to metastasize to the liver. This is not considered primary liver cancer and these liver tumors are treated with regard to their point of origin in the body, not as primary liver cancer.

Lung Cancer Overview

Lung Cancer is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in one or both lungs. These abnormal cells do not carry out the functions of normal lung cells and do not develop into healthy lung tissue. As they grow, the abnormal cells can form tumors and interfere with the functioning of the lung, which provides oxygen to the body via the blood.

There are three major types of lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and lung carcinoid tumors.

Non-small cell lung cancer: NSCLC is the most common (85%) type of lung cancer. Subtypes include squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell carcinoma.

Small cell lung cancer: SCLC, also called Oat Cell Disease, accounts for 10-15% of lung cancers. It is a type of neuroendocrine (hormone-releasing) tumor with cells that are smaller sized than most cancer cells.

Lung carcinoid tumor: Less than 5% of lung cancers are LCT, and are usually slow growing and localized neuroendocrine tumors. They are more common in the small intestine, but sometimes are found in the lungs.

Another rare type of cancer that can originate in the lungs: Mesothelioma is a cancer is associated with exposure to asbestos, and originates in the linings of the organs (lungs, abdomen, heart, and chest).

Lymphoma overview

the term Lymphoma encompasses a variety of cancers specific to the lymphatic system. The lymphatic system is an important network of glands and vessels which make up the body’s primary line of defense against infection and disease. Most lymphomas arise from lymphocytes (white blood cells) that originate in the lymph nodes, bone marrow, spleen, and thymus.

Overview of Melanoma

Melanoma is a cancer that starts in the melanocyte (melanin producing) cells of the skin. Melanoma begins when normal melanocytes change and grow uncontrollably, forming a tumor. Melanoma most often starts on the chest or back.

Melanoma is less common than basal cell and squamous cell skin cancers (accounting for less than 5% of skin cancers) but it is usually far more dangerous and likely to spread to other parts of the body. When found early, melanoma can often be cured with surgery. However, melanoma is the most serious form of skin cancer and can grow deep into the skin, invading lymph and blood vessels.

Treatment is more difficult when the melanoma has spread to other organs, and involves shrinking the skin cancer through a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and immunotherapy treatments.

Overview of Multiple Myeloma

Multiple myeloma is a hematologic (blood) malignancy that forms in a type of white blood cell called a plasma cell. Plasma cells are a type of fully developed B lymphocytes, a group of white blood cells that originate in the bone marrow and play an important role in the immune system. This disease is called “multiple” myeloma because tumors often develop in more than one location in the bone marrow.

In myeloma, one population of normal antibody-producing plasma cells transform into malignant myeloma cells and replicate uncontrollably. Instead of producing healthy germ fighting antibodies, the malignant cells produce abnormal proteins (such as monoclonal M- protein) that crowd out and inhibit the production of normal blood cells and antibodies in the bone marrow.

Symptoms associated with Multiple Myeloma “CRAB” hyperCalcemia, Renal insufficiency, Anemia, Bone lesions: The immune system is negatively affected by the overproduction of one antibody and can no longer effectively target all pathogens. As the plasma cells continue to multiply, damage to organs can occur, specifically the kidneys. Anemia results when the myeloma prevents the bone marrow from producing red blood cells. Osteolytic lesions (soft spots in the bone) by melanoma cells often replace solid healthy bone marrow.

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Overview of Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian cancer is the malignant growth of cells that form a tumor in the ovaries, the pair of female reproductive glands in which eggs are formed, located one on each side of the uterus. The ovaries contain three cell types: epithelial cells, germ cells, and stromal cells. Ovarian cancer can develop from each of these cell types.

Epithelial ovarian cancer: most ovarian cancers, (86-90%), are epithelial ovarian cancer, originating in the epithelial cells that cover the surface of the ovary and the fallopian tube.

Germ cell & Stromal cell tumors: less commonly, ovarian cancer develops from the egg-producing cells of the ovaries, called germ cell tumors, or from the connective tissues that hold the ovaries together and make hormones, called stromal tumors.

Pancreatic Cancer Overview

The pancreas is a gland, about six inches long, located in the abdomen that is surrounded by the stomach, small intestine, liver, spleen and gallbladder.

The pancreas is both an exocrine gland and endocrine gland:

Exocrine cells of the pancreas produce enzymes that help with digestion. The endocrine cells of the pancreas produce hormones, which are substances that control or regulate many specific functions in the body. The two main pancreatic hormones are insulin and glucagon. Insulin lowers blood sugar levels and glucagon raises blood sugar levels. Together, these two main hormones work to maintain the proper level of sugar in the blood.

Exocrine Tumors: Pancreatic cancer begins when abnormal cells within the pancreas grow uncontrollably and form a tumor. More than 95% of pancreatic cancers are classified as exocrine tumors and more than 90% of these tumors are adenocarcinomas, where the cancer begins in the cells lining the pancreatic duct.

Rare forms of pancreatic cancers include:

  • Acinar Cell Carcinoma, which overproduces enzymes to digest fats
  • Intraductal Papillary-Mucinous Neoplasm, which is a cystic tumor usually located in the main pancreatic duct or in side branches of the duct
  • Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma, which is a cystic tumor usually located in the tail of the pancreas that is filled with a thick fluid called mucin

Endocrine Tumors: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) account for less that 5% of all pancreatic cancers. They arise from the hormone producing cells in the pancreas called islet cells. PNETs are functional, meaning they produce hormones, or nonfunctional, producing no hormones. Most PNETs are nonfunctional and cancerous.

Overview of Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is cancer that begins in the walnut-sized gland, located beneath the bladder in the male reproductive system that makes most of the semen that carries sperm. Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in the United States. There are several types of cells in the prostate, but nearly all prostate cancers start in the gland cells. This kind of cancer is known as adenocarcinoma and makes up over 95% of diagnosed prostate cancers.

Prostate cancers usually grow slowly, but fast growing types exist that require immediate and aggressive treatment. Treatments include expectant management (watchful waiting) or active surveillance, surgery, radiation treatment, cryosurgery, hormone therapy, chemotherapy and vaccine treatment.

Stomach Cancer Overview

Stomach Cancer, also called Gastric Cancer, is cancer that occurs in the stomach- the muscular sac located in the upper middle of the abdomen, just below the ribs.

Virtually all stomach cancers (90-95%) are adenocarcinomas: cancer that begins in the glandular tissue that lines the inside of the stomach. Adenocarcinomas are further classified as either intestinal or diffuse.

Overview of Thyroid Cancer

Thyroid cancer is a malignancy that originates in the butterfly shaped gland located in the front of the neck. The thyroid is responsible for the regulation of blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature and weight.

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Types of Thyroid Cancer:

Papillary thyroid cancer : papillary thyroid cancer is the most common type (70-80%) of thyroid cancers. Papillary thyroid cancer tends to grow slowly and often spreads to lymph nodes in the neck.

Follicular thyroid cancer : follicular thyroid cancer (10-15% of thyroid cancers) tends to occur in older patients and often spreads to the lymph nodes in the neck. Follicular cancer sometimes also spreads to the lungs and bones.

Medullary thyroid cancer : medullary thyroid cancer (5-10% of thyroid cancers) often has a familiar genetic origin. A test for a genetic mutation in the RET proto-oncogene can lead to an early diagnosis of medullary thyroid cancer and curative surgery to remove the thyroid.

Anaplastic thyroid cancer : anaplastic thyroid cancer often presents as advanced and aggressive thyroid cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes of the neck, lungs or bones. Anaplastic thyroid cancer usually requires aggressive treatment, including tracheostomy, surgery, radiation, targeted drugs and chemotherapy.

ALL below is adapted from Hematology Oncology Associate

Support Group for Colon Cancer:

Colon Cancer Alliance (Patient Advocacy Group) Monthly Patient Webinars from Fight Colorectal Cancer
http://www.ccalliance.org/

Colon Cancer Buddy Program (peer-to-peer support for newly diagnosed colorectal patients)
https://ccalliance.org/volunteer/buddy_program.html

Fight Colon Cancer
http://fightcolorectalcancer.org/

Daily Strength (Online Support Group)
http://www.dailystrength.org/c/Colon-Cancer/support-group

Colorectal Cancer Network (not for profit foundation that offers information about colorectal cancer symptoms, treatment, and support for patients)
http://www.colorectal-cancer.net

Susie’s Colon Cancer Foundation
http://www.coloncancerfoundation.org

Cancer Care: free counseling, support groups, education, financial assistance, online, telephone and in person support groups led by oncology social workers
http://www.cancercare.org/diagnosis/colorectal_cancer

Fighting Chance- free counseling service for cancer patients and caregivers
http://fightingchance.org/resourceGuide.shtml

Support for Colorectal Cancer:

Cancer Care Website
http://www.cancercare.org/diagnosis/colorectal_cancer

National Cancer Institute Educational Pages
http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/colon/Patient/page6
http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/colon/Patient/page2

Colon Cancer Information from Live Strong
http://www.livestrong.com/colon-

ASCO Colorectal Cancer Info
cancer/http://www.cancer.net/sites/cancer.net/files/asco_answers_colorectal.pdf

Adrenal Cancer Support
http://www.adrenocorticalcarcinoma.org/

ACC Compassion
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ACCompassion/info

Adrenal Cancer Information
http://adrenalcancerinfo.com/

Cancer Support Community
http://www.cancersupportcommunity.org/

Imerman Angels One-On-One Cancer Support
www.imermanangels.org

Wellness Community
www.cancersupportcommunity.org

Daily Strength Online Support Group
www.dailystrength.org

Fighting Chance- free counseling service for cancer patients and caregivers
http://fightingchance.org/resourceGuide.shtml

American Bladder Cancer Society
http://bladdercancersupport.org/bladder-cancer-help/information/clinical-trials

American Cancer Society
http://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatmentsandsideeffects/clinicaltrials/app/clinical-trials-matching-service

NIH Cancer.gov
http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/search

Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network
http://www.bcan.org/facing-bladder-cancer/support-groups/

Inspire Support Groups
https://www.inspire.com/groups/bladder-cancer-advocacy-network/

Imerman Angels (to connect directly with another survivor or caregiver through an organization that creates personal, one-on-one connections among patients, survivors, and caregivers)
http://www.imermanangels.org

Fighting Chance- free counseling service for cancer patients and caregivers
http://fightingchance.org/resourceGuide.shtml

Support Group for Brain Cancer

NYU Brain Cancer Caregiver Support Group
http://cancer.med.nyu.edu/patients/patient-care/supportive-services/support-groups

Support Group for Cervical Cancer

Imerman Angels (to connect directly with another survivor or caregiver through an organization that creates personal, one-on-one connections among patients, survivors, and caregivers)
http://www.imermanangels.org

Fighting Chance (free counseling service for cancer patients and caregivers).
http://fightingchance.org/resourceGuide.shtml

National Cervical Cancer Coalition
http://www.nccc-online.org/

Cancer Support Community
http://www.cancersupportcommunity.org/MainMenu/About-Cancer/Types-of-Cancer/Cervical

Foundation for Women’s Cancer
http://www.foundationforwomenscancer.org/

Cervical Cancer Support Group
http://www.dailystrength.org/c/Cervical-Cancer/support-group

Support for Esophageal Cancer

Cancer Support Community
http://www.cancersupportcommunity.org/

Cancer Care: counseling, support groups, financial assistance
http://www.cancercare.org/

ECAA Esophageal Cancer Awareness Association
http://www.ecaware.org/

Daily Strength
http://www.dailystrength.org/c/Esophageal-Cancer/support-group

Support For Head And Neck Cancer (SPOHNC):

Support for People with Oral and Head and Neck Cancer
https://www.spohnc.org/

American Cancer Society Head and Neck cancer support group chapters
http://www.cancer.org/treatment/supportprogramsservices/app/resource-detail.aspx?resourceId=106058

HNC Support International
https://www.hncsupport.org/

Inspire Support Community
https://www.inspire.com/groups/head-and-neck-cancer-alliance/

American Head & Neck Society
http://www.ahns.info/

Daily Strength Online Community Discussion Boards
http://www.dailystrength.org/c/Head-and-Neck-cancers/support-group

The Swallows: not for profit for head and neck cancer
http://www.theswallows.org.uk/

Cancer Care Support Groups

Cancer Care Support Groups
http://www.cancercare.org/diagnosis/ovarian_cancer

Gilda’s Club New York City
http://www.gildasclubnyc.org/

Imerman Angels (to connect directly with another survivor or caregiver through an organization that creates personal, one-on-one connections among patients, survivors, and caregivers)
http://www.imermanangels.org

Fighting Chance (free counseling service for cancer patients and caregivers).
http://fightingchance.org/resourceGuide.shtml

Kidney Cancer Support Group

Kidney Cancer Association Support Groups
http://www.kidneycancer.org/

Daily Strength Kidney cancer Support Group
http://www.dailystrength.org/c/Renal-Cell-Carcinoma-Kidney-Cancer/support-group

Cancer Care Kidney cancer Support Group
http://www.cancercare.org/diagnosis/kidney_cancer

Association of Cancer Online Resources
http://www.acor.org/

National Kidney Foundation Support Groups
http://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/kidneycancer

Imerman Angels (to connect directly with another survivor or caregiver through an organization that creates personal, one-on-one connections among patients, survivors, and caregivers)
http://www.imermanangels.org

Fighting Chance (free counseling service for cancer patients and caregivers).
http://fightingchance.org/resourceGuide.shtml

Support Group for Leukemia

Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Support groups
http://www.lls.org/diseaseinformation/getinformationsupport/supportgroups/

Acute Myelogenous Leukemia AML Support Group
http://www.dailystrength.org/c/Acute-Myelogenous-Leukemia-AML/support-group

Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia ALL Support Group
http://www.dailystrength.org/c/Acute-Lymphocytic-Leukemia-ALL/support-group

MD Junction Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Support Group
http://www.mdjunction.com/acute-myelogenous-leukemia

ACOR Association of Cancer Online Resources
http://www.acor.org/

Caring4Cancer Support Groups
https://www.caring4cancer.com/go/all/wellbeing

The National CML Society
http://www.nationalcmlsociety.org/

Inspire Support Groups
https://www.inspire.com/groups/bladder-cancer-advocacy-network/

Imerman Angels (to connect directly with another survivor or caregiver through an organization that creates personal, one-on-one connections among patients, survivors, and caregivers)
http://www.imermanangels.org

Fighting Chance- free counseling service for cancer patients and caregivers
http://fightingchance.org/resourceGuide.shtml

Support Group for Liver Cancer

Cancer Support Community
http://www.cancersupportcommunity.org/

Imerman Angels One-On-One Cancer Support
www.imermanangels.org

Wellness Community
www.cancersupportcommunity.org

Daily Strength Online Support Group
www.dailystrength.org

Fighting Chance- free counseling service for cancer patients and caregivers
http://fightingchance.org/resourceGuide.shtml

Cancer Connect
www.cancerconnect.org

Support Group for Leukemia

Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS provides comprehensive financial and educational resources for lymphoma patients)
www.nhlcyberfamily.org/

Fighting Chance, a free New York counseling service for cancer patients and caregivers
http://fightingchance.org

Support Group for Melanoma

American Melanoma Foundation Support Groups
http://www.melanomafoundation.org/AMF/patient.htm

AIM at Melanoma support groups
http://www.aimatmelanoma.org/en/aim-for-answers/patient-and-caregiver-support/support-groups.html

Melanoma Research Foundation
http://www.melanoma.org/find-support/patient-community/mpip-melanoma-patients-information-page

Melanoma Center Support Groups and Programs
http://www.melanomacenter.org/life/groupsandprograms.html

Skin Cancer Foundation Support Services
http://www.skincancer.org/skin-cancer-information/support

Melanoma Foundation Support Groups
www.melanomafoundation.org

Wellness Community Support Groups
www.melanomafoundation.org

Caring4Cancer Support Groups
https://www.caring4cancer.com/go/all/wellbeing

Imerman Angels (to connect directly with another survivor or caregiver through an organization that creates personal, one-on-one connections among patients, survivors, and caregivers)
http://www.imermanangels.org

Fighting Chance NY– free counseling service for cancer patients and caregivers
http://fightingchance.org/resourceGuide.shtml

 

Support Group For Multiple Myeloma

International Myeloma Foundation Support Groups
http://myeloma.org/SupportGroup.action?tabId=6&menuId=49&queryPageId=7

Cancer Care Support Groups
http://www.cancercare.org/diagnosis/multiple_myeloma

More Multiple Myeloma Opportunities for Research & Education
http://www.mmore.org/MyelomaSupportGroups.html

Daily Strength Online Message Boards
http://www.dailystrength.org/c/Multiple-Myeloma/support-group

American Cancer Society Support Groups
http://www.cancer.org/treatment/supportprogramsservices/app/resource-detail.aspx?resourceId=90608

Multiple Myeloma Living with Myeloma Support Community
http://www.lifewithmultiplemyeloma.org/

Cancer Support Community: Multiple Myeloma
www.cancersupportcommunity.org/MainMenu/About-Cancer/Types-of-Cancer/Multiple-Myeloma

Caring4Cancer Support Groups
https://www.caring4cancer.com/go/all/wellbeing

Imerman Angels (to connect directly with another survivor or caregiver through an organization that creates personal, one-on-one connections among patients, survivors, and caregivers)
http://www.imermanangels.org

Fighting Chance NY- free counseling service for cancer patients and caregivers
http://fightingchance.org/resourceGuide.shtml

Support Group for Ovarian Cancer:

National Ovarian Cancer Coalition
http://www.ovarian.org/

Ovarian Cancer National Alliance
http://www.ovariancancer.org/resources/

Ovarian Cancer Support Group-Daily Strength
http://www.dailystrength.org/c/Ovarian-Cancer/support-group

Cancer Care Support Groups
http://www.cancercare.org/diagnosis/ovarian_cancer

Gilda’s Club New York City
http://www.gildasclubnyc.org/

Ovarian Cancer Support Groups Resource
http://ovarian-cancer.supportgroups.com/

Imerman Angels (to connect directly with another survivor or caregiver through an organization that creates personal, one-on-one connections among patients, survivors, and caregivers)
http://www.imermanangels.org

Fighting Chance (free counseling service for cancer patients and caregivers).
http://fightingchance.org/resourceGuide.shtml

Support Group for Pancreatic Cancer:

Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PANCAN)
www.pancan.org

The National Pancreatic Foundation
http://www.pancreasfoundation.org/patient-information/pancreatic-cancer/pancreatic-cancer-support-group/

Cancer Connect
www.cancerconnect.org

The Pancreatic Center
http://pancreasmd.org/support_group.html

Daily Strength
http://www.dailystrength.org/c/Pancreatic-Cancer/support-group

Fighting Chance- free counseling service for cancer patients and caregivers
http://fightingchance.org/resourceGuide.shtml

Support Group for Prostate Cancer:

Gilda’s Club New York City
http://www.gildasclubnyc.org/

Imerman Angels (to connect directly with another survivor or caregiver through an organization that creates personal, one-on-one connections among patients, survivors, and caregivers)
http://www.imermanangels.org

Fighting Chance (free counseling service for cancer patients and caregivers).
http://fightingchance.org/resourceGuide.shtml

Prostate Cancer Foundation Support Groups
http://www.pcf.org/site/c.leJRIROrEpH/b.5856543/k.6599/Finding_a_Support_Group.htm

Online Support Group from WebMD for Prostate Cancer
http://exchanges.webmd.com/prostate-cancer-exchange

Yana Online Support Group
http://www.yananow.net/

MD junction online discussion board
http://www.mdjunction.com/prostate-cancer

His Prostate Cancer-Support group for wives and partners
http://www.hisprostatecancer.com/prostate-cancer-support-groups.html

Support Group for Stomach Cancer:

Cancer Support Community
http://www.cancersupportcommunity.org/MainMenu/About-Cancer/Types-of-Cancer/Gastric

No Stomach For Cancer
http://www.nostomachforcancer.org/

Daily Strength Stomach Cancer Support Groups
http://www.dailystrength.org/c/Gastric-Cancer/support-group

Debbie’s Dream Foundation: Curing Stomach Cancer
http://www.debbiesdream.org/portal/

Fighting Chance-free counseling service for cancer patients and caregivers
http://fightingchance.org

Thyroid Cancer Support Group

ThyCa: Thyroid Cancer Survivors’ Association, Inc.
www.thyca.org

Caring4Cancer
www.caring4cancer.com/go/thyroid/wellbeing

Imerman Angels: to connect directly with another survivor or caregiver through an organization that creates personal, one-on-one connections among patients, survivors, and caregivers.
http://www.imermanangels.org

Fighting Chance: free counseling service for cancer patients and caregivers.
http://fightingchance.org/resourceGuide.shtml